Marcelo Kramer begins each of his capoeira classes with a history lesson. Then comes the music, and he expects everyone to join. Only after that does he begin instruction in the martial art.

Kramer, 33, has taught capoeira at ETSU’s Basler Center for Physical Activity since May 2016. He works hard to incorporate the cultural and historical significance of capoeira into the physical aspects of the class.

Published in 2017

Universities and colleges in the United States accept students from around the globe to help students further their education and East Tennessee State University is in that category. Students travel hours to ETSU and for Maria Avila, it was no different.

Avila arrived as a freshman in spring 2013. She traveled from Cuernavaca, Mexico, the capital city in the state of Morelos. When she went home after a semester in the United States, she wasn’t sure she wanted to return. She missed her family and home.

Published in 2017

In 2010, Michael Luchtan set out on an adventure to Mexico, hoping to learn Spanish and study Mexican heritage through its music. Along the way, he hoped to bridge divides between it and his own culture.

In 2016, Rodrigo Guridi came to East Tennessee State University from Uruguay to continue his music studies. His friend Diego Núñez would later follow.

Through Arrabal, a tango trio born from the three men’s love of music, Luchtan’s goals have been realized.

“Music doesn’t know about borders,” Núñez said. “People used to cross borders and music would just go with the people.”

Published in 2017
Friday, 05 May 2017 16:49

Beatriz Cano Diaz

Beatriz Cano Diaz

After moving to the U.S. at 16, a Cuban immigrant begins her journey as a filmmaker in East Tennessee. By Audrey Love and Kelsey Tweed

Published in Video
Wednesday, 19 April 2017 17:00

Latina Leader

Latina Leader

As president of East Tennessee State University's Panhellenic Council, Tiffani Carrasco wants to bring more diversity to sororities. By Karthik Venkataraman and Leon Humphrey, Jr.

Published in Video
Tuesday, 28 March 2017 18:19

Tennis in Tennessee

Tennis in Tennessee

One came from Monterrey, Mexico. The other is from Barcelona, Spain. Together, Diego Nuñez and Robert Herrera are a winning partnership for ETSU men's tennis. By David Floyd and Jacob Townsend

Published in Video

A mother and her child are waiting for their two-year checkup at East Tennessee State University’s pediatric clinic when José Zepeda and a resident pediatrician enter the room.

“How’s our little girl?” said the doctor.

¿Cómo está la niña?” said Zepeda.

Muy bien!” said the mother of the child in question.

“She is very well,” said Zepeda to the doctor, glancing at the little girl with a smile.

The mother does not speak English and the doctor does not speak Spanish, but the seemingly endless questionnaire of things like, “How many servings of fruits and vegetables does she eat per day?” goes over with ease.

“There is an art to interpreting,” said Zepeda, a certified medical interpreter at ETSU Pediatrics. “My job is to help two people who cannot communicate with each other come together and be able to care for this child. That is why I love doing this.”

Published in 2015