A farmworker dons his work gear, readying himself for another long, hot day in the fields. As he prepares to leave, his young daughter Lucy stops him, hoping to come with him.

The man shakes his head, telling Lucy he doesn’t want her to get hurt. She reacts in anger and sneaks into the fields against his will. Then, she comes across plants that have just been sprayed with pesticides.

“Oh, plants,” she remarks as she eats one, curious. Her father finds her soon after, collapsed from symptoms of poisoning. He rushes her to the hospital, but her condition proved too advanced to cure.

When you ask Silvia Fregoso how many children she has, she asks, "My biological children or my other children?"

For the last 27 years, Fregoso has worked in early childhood education with the Telamon Corp. Migrant and Seasonal Head Start program. She currently has 31 children under her care in Elizabethton. When she started her career, Fregoso wasn’t sure if the job was right for her.

"My husband worked in the fields back in those days, and they had no bilingual people to work with the Head Start program, and I wasn't really bilingual yet, but Head Start recruited me," she said. 

In a small gymnasium in Kingsport, Tennessee, more than 100 Mexican nationals stand in line or sit patiently in chairs, waiting to be ushered to a long bank of cameras, printers and office equipment near the back of the room.

There, employees of the Mexican consulate in Atlanta wait behind a long line of tables, taking photos of and speaking to the visitors who need a passport, consular ID — matricula — or other documents. 

Tuesday, 03 May 2016 14:49

Putting a spark in downtown

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Putting a spark in downtown

Inspired by his Mexican grandfather, entrepreneur José Castillo created Spark Plaza, a shared workspace in Johnson City. By Tyler Shortt and Josh Still, edited by John Queener

Friday, 29 April 2016 13:54

Behind the camera

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Behind the camera

For ETSU student Inés Galiano-Torres, filmmaking is a way to challenge cultural stereotypes. By Jake Burbage and Alex Morton

 

Thursday, 28 April 2016 21:37

Latin steps

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Latin steps

Teacher BJ Goliday shares the bachata with dancers in the Tri-Cities. By Stephen Jansen, edited by John Queener

Tuesday, 19 April 2016 18:30

An alternate path

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An alternate path

ETSU's Dr. Neil Borja uses acupuncture and integrative medicine to treat what ails you. By Heather Salyers and Nick Haas, edited by John Queener

Como padre, ¿piensa usted en la obesidad? ¿Se preocupa por sus hijos desarrollando esta enfermedad? Si es así, usted y sus hijos pueden participar en un estudio para aprender más sobre la obesidad y el síndrome metabólico y cómo prevenir estas enfermedades.

La obesidad, o el sobrepeso, es una epidemia en los Estados Unidos, dice el Dr. Arsham Alamian, profesor de epidemiología en la East Tennessee State University (ETSU). Pero este problema es más grave entre la población hispana.

As a parent, do you think about obesity? Do you worry about your children developing this condition? If so, you and your children can participate in a study to learn more about obesity and metabolic syndrome and how to prevent these conditions.

Obesity, or being overweight, is an epidemic in the U.S., says Dr. Arsham Alamian, a professor of epidemiology at East Tennnessee State University. But this problem is more serious among the Hispanic population.

En el béisbol de la liga menor, los atletas vienen desde miles de millas de distancia con la esperanza de llegar al siguiente nivel. Sólo tienen unos meses para demostrar de lo que son capaces o ser mandados de regreso a casa… de vuelta al punto de partida.

El equipo novato de los Johnson City Cardinals tiene muchos admiradores que los apoyan durante el verano. Los niños jóvenes respetan a los jugadores porque son los únicos jugadores de béisbol en la ciudad más allá del nivel colegial.

El lado de los Cardinals que la mayoría de los fans no ven son los atletas que vienen desde fuera de los EE.UU.

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