topbanner

From humble beginnings in Mexico City to a life in Northeast Tennessee, brothers Josiamar and Carlos Martinez dreamed of owning their own business.

During their childhoods in Mexico City, the brothers were already earning their own money.

“We made favors to the people,” Josiamar said. “They asked, ‘Can you buy something for me at the store?’, and we made money and would use bicycles to get there. We were 6 and 11 years old. Older people, they don’t want to go out, and would tip us and things like that.”

Visiting yard sales throughout the year helps keep the brothers in business at the Jonesborough Flea Market, where they work on Sundays.

Thursday, 06 November 2014 00:00

Classes offer citizenship opportunity

Written by

For 10 weeks last summer, six immigrants attended classes in Johnson City, Tennessee, to prepare for the United States citizenship test. Alejandra Malfovon was one of the four who graduated after completing the class.

"With the class on Saturdays, it gave me time to study and prepare throughout the week," said Malfovon, who is from Mexico. "It also helped that the class was in Johnson City so that I could attend."

Thursday, 16 October 2014 00:00

Monsters on campus at ETSU

Written by

The human mind often wanders towards the edge of its understanding. The edge of understanding is where imagination begins, and things that are beyond reason can exist.

Walking into Dr. Ana Grinberg's office, one can easily recognize a setup common of any other professor who teaches English courses at East Tennessee State University: shelves crammed with books, chairs for students to sit in during conferences and a desk – clean and computer-occupied – in the corner of the room.

Yet the books lining Grinberg’s shelves are not typical of a professor: "Dracula," "The Vampire in Europe," "Gods, Heroes, and Monsters" and a myriad of other monster-related novels. Grinberg will be teaching a course on monsters in the spring of 2015 at ETSU.

Thursday, 16 October 2014 00:00

Finding love in the Spanish-speaking community

Written by

People who marry into the Spanish-speaking community may find themselves assimilating into both a new culture and a new family. 

One couple's journey led to overcoming a language barrier, while another merged both of their families into one.                

Bob Schaal and Tracie Avila each faced challenges, but they were able to find love and share their stories on what it takes to adjust to another person's culture. 

When most people think of visiting the doctor they usually think of visiting a medical doctor, somebody who examines symptoms and prescribes medicine or surgery to help the patient overcome maladies. But other forms of treatment have been widely used around the world.

Neil Anton Borja is a family physician and doctor of osteopathic medicine at East Tennessee State University. He also has a master's of acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine and practices integrative medicine.

Page 8 of 12